"Dyslexia sufferers must get proper statutory support"

Support for dyslexia sufferers in Wales must be given a proper statutory footing – South Wales Central AM Andrew RT Davies has said.

 

Yesterday in the Senedd – Mr Davies raised the issue with First Minister Carwyn Jones – pointing to the situation in other countries across Europe.

 

He described the support available in Italy and Switzerland – where there is a far stronger focus on diagnosis.

 

Affected children are also given statutory rights to dispensatory and compensatory assistance during all stages of education – including at university.

 

The AM – who suffers from dyslexia himself – spoke of his own experiences – and said it was vital future generations had better support.

 

Mr Davies said, “As someone who suffers from dyslexia – I know the challenges it can cause – including one famous incident confusing Brexit with the first meal of the day.

 

“But in all seriousness – dyslexia sufferers face many difficulties – especially throughout their education. It’s therefore vital we place greater emphasis on diagnosis – and ensure sufferers get the support they need.

 

“Yesterday – I raised this with the First Minister – and urged him to ensure a proper legislative framework is in place.”

 

Mr Davies recently visited Tomorrow’s Generation – a specialist learning centre for dyslexic children and young people in Lisvane.

 

The centre was founded by businessman Anders Hedlund – whose IG Design Group employs 500 staff in South Wales and 3000 worldwide.

 

Both men vowed to work together to increase the support available – and plan to launch a petition to the Assembly on the issue.

 

Mr Hedlund said, “The meeting was a great success and I’m extremely encouraged to have found a politician so passionate about dyslexia.

 

“For the first time – I now see the potential for Wales to become a leader in research and awareness for dyslexia – and working with Andrew on this will be a huge leap forward.”

 

ENDS

 

[Picture: Andrew RT Davies AM with Anders Hedlund (first left) and the team at Tomorrow’s Generation Learning Centre in Lisvane]